OLDMANS TOWNSHIP
SCHOOLS
                                                      Literary School

The Literary School, stood near or on the present grounds of the Second Baptist Church and was erected in the
early 1800's. After consulting with the County Superintendent of Schools, The Board of Education closed
Literary School along with the Eight Square School at the end of the 1903-1904 school year. At that time there
was one teacher at the Literary School.   Students were transported to Pedricktown School, and the building was
sold in 1911 to Norman Layman for $25. The Second Baptist Church moved in to the building in 1911.  In 1918
the building and land were conveyed by Norman Layman to the Second Baptist Church.  

                                        









                                               Eight Square or Brick School

An eight-sided brick school, called "Eight Square" or "Brick" was rented in 1821.  It stood on land used by the
U.S. Army on U.S. Route 130.  After consulting with the County Superintendent of Schools, The Board of
Education closed the Eight Square School and the Literary School at the end of the 1903-1904 school year.  
Students from the Eight Square School were transported to Pedricktown School, and the two buildings were sold
in 1911.  Bids for transportation put out and in 1911 there was again a vote on the sale of the school (16 for, 2
against). The school was sold to Albert Sailor for $10 who owned the surrounding farm.  Albert Sailor gave the
1821 cornerstone to W.W. Summerill.  The cornerstone is now in the possession of the Historical Society of
Penns Grove.  It is believed that the U.S. Government took over the land for the Delaware Ordinance Depot
during World War I in 1918 and the school was demolished at that time.














                            Auburn School/Sculltown/Friendship School

One acre of land was purchased from Mathias Louderback by Henry Guest, Samuel Linch, Gideon Scull and
Samuel Flanagan on August 29, 1812. The school house, located on the Sharptown Road near Auburn was
named "Friendship School" and was funded through the pay school system.  The structure at this time was
described as 28 feet front x 24 feet deep x 10 feet high, nine windows, and one door.  In 1851 Auburn had 118
students ages 5-18 and one teacher.  In 1868, twenty feet were added at the rear of the Auburn School and a
glass partition installed.  In 1890 a special tax was raised to build a second story on the school house.
(Descriptions of the building vary and it is not clear if there was more than one structure on this site during this
time).  n 1900 there was one Teaching Principal.  In 1904 one teacher was transferred to the Auburn School
when the Brick School closed. In 1911 the County Superintendent ordered suitable outhouses for Pedricktown
School and Auburn.  It is believed this school was closed in 1923 due to a fire and a new school was erected
also called Auburn School and later Mary B. Farley School.















                                        Auburn/Mary B. Farley School


In July 1923 there was a petition for Auburn to build a new school house at a cost of $15,200.  This was
defeated. A second vote in September of 1924 was passed and Harvey Cawley built the existing building that
same year.  This school was also called Auburn School and later Mary B. Farley School after a teacher who was
elected to teach in 1918.  In 1948 a common entrance was modified to two doors to make room for rest rooms
and a heater room.  In 1946 the school housed K-1 but prior to that it housed K-4 in one room and grades 5-8 in
the other room.  In 1974 Auburn School, which had been housing K-1, closed and those students began
attending Pedricktown School.  Two fifth grade classes that had been moved to the Methodist Church also
moved back into Pedricktown School and grades 6-8 began attending the new middle school on Freed Road.

















                                                    Pedricktown School


A new school in Pedricktown was built around 1845 on one quarter of an acre of land purchased by trustees of
the district.  An adjacent acre was purchased in 1868 for $600, and the school was enlarged.  In 1904 there
were five teachers at this school.  In 1906, high school studies moved from Perkintown, Literary School, Eight
Square to Pedricktown.  In 1911 the County Superintendent ordered suitable outhouses for Pedricktown School
and Auburn. The Perkintown and Pedricktown Schools were in serious need of repairs in 1912.  In June of that
year, the County Superintendent informed the Board that improvements would have to be made to the buildings
in order for them to remain in use. In 1914 the Board of Education voted to sell the school house and to have it
removed within 60 days.
















                                                    Pedricktown School

In February 1913 there was discussion of a new building at a cost of $20,000.  This was rejected without new
land.  The Board purchased land on Auburn Road from the Sparks family and on June 17, 1913, the bond issue
was approved.  A room in the firehouse would be leased until the school was completed.  The new building,
constructed of Hummelstown Brown Stone from Pennsylvania was built by Titus and Knecht.  The school was
dedicated on December 24, 1914 and opened on January 4, 1915. The old Pedricktown and Perkintown schools
were sold in 1914 and ordered torn down within sixty days of the sale.  Additional playground space was
purchased in 1927, and a fence enclosing the area was erected in 1928.  An auditorium was made in the
basement in 1938, and a platform was constructed at one end. To relieve overcrowding in Pedricktown, in June
1955 voters approved a four-room addition and major modifications to the heating system.  Temporary
classroom facilities were obtained by renting space in the First Baptist Church.  The purchase of 2 1/2 acres of
land in 1957 further expanded the playground area.  In 1964 a kitchen was installed and a new fence out front
at a cost of $5,500. In 1974 Auburn School, which had been housing all kindergarten and first grade pupils,
closed and those students began attending Pedricktown School.  Two 5th grade classes that had been moved
to the Methodist Church also moved back into Pedricktown and grades 6-8 began attending the new middle
school on Freed Road.


                                                     Perkintown School

Perkintown School was located in the Perkintown Methodist Church which was sold to the School District in
1878. Prior to that the school was in a frame building nearby.  In 1906, high school studies moved from
Perkintown, Literary School, and Eight Square to Pedricktown School. The Perkintown and Pedricktown Schools
were in serious need of repairs in 1912.  In June of that year, the County Superintendent informed the Board
that improvements would have to be made to the buildings in order for them to remain in use.  As a result,
Perkintown School closed June 25, 1912 and room was rented in the fire house as plans for the construction of
Pedricktown School got underway.  Bids were sought for transportation to Pedricktown School and in in 1914 the
Board of Education voted to sell the school house and land at Perkintown













                 Oldmans Middle School/Oldmans Township School K-8

In anticipation of future school needs thirty-five acres along Freed Road were purchased in 1965 for $36,000.   
Planning of the school began in 1969 at a cost of $425,000.  Bids in 1972 were too high to accept.  
Modifications were made to the plans, but the second set of bids were still too high.  This called for a
referendum in April 1973 and a new cost of $487,000 was passed. An eight-sided, seven-room structure was
built for grades 6-8 and opened in September 1974. Renovations in 1982 added a gym for all students, church
leagues, YMCA, Adult Education, 4th community center, home economics room for grades 6-8, and a music
room.  Ground was broken for more renovations in 2000 making the school K-8.  In 2009 there were 207
students and eighteen teachers.  In 2016 there were 289 students enrolled and twenty-two full time teachers.